The impact of hands-on food-based education is clear.

A robust, human-centered evaluation strategy.

Since launching Good School Food, we have developed a rigorous system for measuring the program. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate our work, we use the results to craft the most impactful program possible for our students.

35,000 seeds sown
35,000 seeds sown
4,646 students engaged
4,646 students engaged
1,000 lessons a year
1,000 lessons a year
1,200 taste tests
1,200 taste tests
1910 Student Internship Hours for Course Credit
1910 Student Internship Hours for Course Credit
379 varieties of fruits and vegetables grown
379 varieties of fruits and vegetables grown
Additional Impact Facts & News
University of Alabama at Birmingham Partnership

Jones Valley Teaching Farm has partnered with Dr. Matthew Fifolt, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Care Organization and Policy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health (UAB-SOPH) to study Good School Food through a qualitative lens. We invite you to read his research, published in the Journal of Experiential Education, about our work. Click Here to download Dr. Fifolt’s report.

Student & Staff Highlights: 2016-2017 Report Card

This report card highlights some of our students’ and staff’s accomplishments during the 2016-2017 school year. Click Here to download the report card.

Learn all about the numbers: 2016 JVTF Annual Report

We invite you to download a copy of our 2016-2017 Annual Report. Click Here to download the annual report.

Stories and Reflections about Good School Food's Impact
Jerick Hamilton
Woodlawn High School Teaching Farm Intern

“Every day when I come here, I think about having fun and doing what I am supposed to do, but every day that I come out here I think about my future. Here. Like, what I want to do three years from now. I know I want to do something with Jones Valley.”

Cyrenthia Linton
Parent of Good School Food Student

“As a result of my son’s activity with Good School Food, he has discovered an interest in gardening, learned the importance of agriculture, developed his marketing and entrepreneurial instincts, learned more about conservation, and contributed to the development of an on-site greenhouse. I’m certain he has learned skills that he will utilize for a lifetime.”

John Mark Edwards
8th Grade Teacher at Phillips Academy

“This school year, my 8th-grade world history students spent four days at JVTF immersed in the most hands-on lesson of the agricultural revolution that I have ever witnessed. Bringing ancient world history to life for 13-year-olds is an incredible challenge, to say the least, but the Good School Food Instructors were able to turn the teaching farm into an exciting outdoor classroom where students literally used all five senses to learn about one of the most crucial changes in human history. The impact this lesson had on students could be measured in both quantitative as well as qualitative data. The experience had a strong correlation to students’ overall understanding of the content, and student reflections illustrated personal growth and enjoyment in the learning process.”